Perspectives on Alzheimer’s Disease Research from Worldwide’s Chief Medical & Scientific Officer

Michael Murphy, M.D., Ph.D., has been on the forefront of Alzheimer’s disease research since the advent of cholinesterase inhibitors as a cognitive therapeutic in the late 1970s. As Chief Medical & Scientific Officer of Worldwide Clinical Trials, Dr. Murphy provides a strategic leadership role in program and protocol design across multiple therapeutic areas, for both interventional and observational research. Dr. Murphy is responsible for the coordination of didactic and experiential training services for the Worldwide Fellowship program, which bears his name. He is the recipient of the Clinical Research & Excellence (CARE) Lifetime Achievement Award for 2017. The award is presented annually to an extraordinary individual with exceptional contributions and a consistent history of service to the clinical research industry throughout their career. In addition, PharmaVoice selected him as one of 2017’s 100 Most Inspiring People in the life-sciences industry.

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Uncommon Patient Recruitment Strategies in Alzheimer’s Disease Clinical Trials – Part 3

As recounted in part one  and part two of “Uncommon Patient Recruitment Strategies in Alzheimer’s Disease Clinical Trials”, clinical trial enrollment in early phase Alzheimer’s disease (AD) clinical trials imposes heavier management burdens due to the number of clinical sites and cohorts, or groups, of patients enrolled per site. Part one of this series reflected on clinical trial enrollment challenges such as sluggish recruitment that can result from overburdened clinical site personnel, while part two discussed how Worldwide Clinical Trials began to develop a technology assisted cohort optimization strategy to reinvigorate recruitment and ensure efficient patient enrollment strategies.

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Uncommon Patient Recruitment Strategies in Alzheimer’s Disease Clinical Trials – Part 2

In part one of “Uncommon Patient Recruitment Strategies in Alzheimer’s Disease Clinical Trials”, Talking Trials discussed the recent clinical trial enrollment challenges for early phase Alzheimer’s disease clinical trials. Though not traditionally considered, the exhaustion level and recruitment fatigue of clinical trial site staff due to fast moving and unpredictable patient enrollment scenarios has become a potential barrier to efficient management of these early phase, or “cohort” studies, which are characterized by a relatively small number of patients being enrolled at each dose or cohort across one or more clinical sites. Too often the result is sluggish recruitment and randomization which leads to missed timelines, potentially putting funding or other critical milestones at risk.

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Unique 4-step approach limits high screen failure in Alzheimer’s disease research – Part 2

As noted in part one of this blog series, Worldwide Clinical Trials takes an uncommonly proactive approach to reducing screen failure in Alzheimer’s disease (AD) research. This strategy is especially useful as early-stage clinical studies make up a growing percentage of Alzheimer’s clinical trials. Worldwide’s uncommonly proactive four-step strategy is initiated at the protocol development stage, carries through into prescreening and pre-randomization by targeting semi-predictable reasons for screen failure in Alzheimer’s clinical trials and improving decision making with a centralized eligibility review system.

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Unique 4-step approach limits high screen failure in Alzheimer’s disease research – Part 1

  In past blogs, we have discussed the necessity for improving screen failure and recruitment rates in Alzheimer’s disease research. To reduce this failure, Worldwide Clinical Trials takes an uncommonly proactive 4-step approach to increase the predictability of patient screening. Developed by Worldwide’s experts, who have 40 years of Alzheimer’s research experience, this unique strategy begins during clinical trial protocol development, involves activities prior to both patient consent and randomization, and centralizes eligibility review to improve enrollment speed and outcomes.

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